City of Moru

In its housing districts and residential areas the city of Moru resembles many other cities. Buildings constructed with bricks, mortar, slates and wood as in most urban centres. Moving into the downtown sector the buildings there are constructed of an entirely different material.

Each building is made up of a furry substance tightly bunched together. If you look at it long enough you could swear that it moves, as if it is vibrating. This substance is also multi – coloured with the full spectrum of chroma present in its make up and texture.

When you ask the locals “what is this material?” you always get the same answer: “wait until the night arrives.” And so you wait in the city of Moru, waiting for the night tide to come in.

As the sky begins to darken the buildings begin to chirp. The vibrations that you thought you had imagined before become defined and pronounced. In this delightfully surreal atmosphere you look up at the night sky, towards the cities tallest sky scraper. Astoundingly it begins to taper away from the top down, fracturing in the night sky, fragmenting into pockets of colour, each pocket fracturing further as it breaks free from the main structure. And it is in this moment that you realise each building here is made up of moths. Every structure is now separating in the same manner. Hundreds of thousands of millions of moths fluttering in the gloaming, all of them contributing to a spectacular opus of colour and motion as the moths head out of the city area into nearby forests and creeks in search of vital sustenance. The sheer number of moths flying at once results in many wing scales raining down on the fading city, forming a colourful, ethereal mist. As the moths leave, you sit in an empty city, accompanied by a vast concrete plain and street lights, covered in discarded multi coloured scales.

When first light appears the moths return and begin the process of compacting themselves together, reconstructing the city. Sometimes one part of the building arrives at a later time than the other components meaning that the other moths have to congregate around street lamps, waiting. When the straggling moths finally arrive the other moths simply merge themselves into the building.

Thus Moru is rebuilt and diurnal life begins once more, built on the back of a lepidopteran armada.

The name Moru was the name of one of Mothra’s fairies in the Mothra trilogy.

This may or may not be the complete text, I had planned on adding this bit:

The moths who inhabit Moru fuse together in such massive numbers that they from into constructions that are structurally immense. The residents realised if these moths could be molded into building shapes then they could function as buildings. And so Moru made its decision to be constructed out of moths.

I actually don’t like this bit as A) I cannot find anywhere to fit it, B) I am not sure the story needs any explaining and C) Its absolutely god awful. Its clunkly and I just don’t think it works at all.

As always feedback is more than welcome, inparticular in a case like this.

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About skyraftwanderer

A person who enjoys writing short story things, poetry and other random things that come into my head.
This entry was posted in Invisible Cities and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to City of Moru

  1. Hazel Ang says:

    i was a little creeped out by this description, but this is a good sign, it means your description came to life and triggered my aversion to moths LOL! You never dissapoint me with your imagination! Its really inspiring. After reading your work, I always have this urge to sketch out the imagery. Please dont ever stop writing!

  2. Wow…I don’t know which one I like better…this one or the Thunderbird. Incredible imagery, my friend. 🙂

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